For me, the Shuttlebirds workshop can be summed up in three words: laughter, learning and loot.  I arrived a little late on Friday (missed my first two classes) but was immediately made to feel welcome by everyone I encountered.  The T-shirt, which I did not design (it is Patti Duff’s creation), but for which I did some tatting, was very well received and many participants were already wearing it.  You have probably already seen a  photo of the shirt and a slideshow of the event on Lady Shuttlemaker’s blog.

The Workshop T-shirt

The Workshop T-shirt

I had my camera with me, but was having way too much fun to think of taking pictures, so have only a few to offer.

Another pretty tatted hat

Another pretty tatted hat

Tatting and chatting

Tatting and chatting

Bev Dillon helping Sherry puzzle through a T.A.T. phase III project

Bev Dillon helping Sherry puzzle through a T.A.T. phase III project

Never having attended a tatting workshop before, I had no basis for comparison, but this one was incredibly well organized and flowed seamlessly from the intense focus of the classrooms to the relaxed conviviality of  meals (which appeared as if by magic, with a fresh set of table favors for each one) and door prize giveaways.  Vendors included Snowgoose, Lady Shuttlemaker, Debbie Arnold, Rebecca Griffiths and Beyond Beads North – so there was plenty of shopping!  When I set out to photograph my haul from the two day event, I was embarrassed to note that it did not all fit in the frame!

The loot

The loot

My first class on Saturday was with Sherry Pence: branching encapsulation.  This technique is a lot of fun and offers the tatter almost infinite flexibility.  Here is what we worked on in class, with a couple more flowers added afterwards:

branching-encapsulation

In the afternoon, I took Patti Duff’s mystery motif class.  As you will have gathered from Sherry’s blog, it involved dizzy picots and dizzy double stitch chains.

dizzy-double-stitch-crop

My last class was with Mimi Dillman, and was an exploration of cluny edgings with twisted thread headers by Sarah Aus, that figured in a 1929 Needlecraft Magazine.

cluny-edging-with-twisted-thread-header

The high point of the class for me had nothing to do with the project we were working on.  In conversation, Mimi mentioned that she has been corresponding with Elisadusud and that Elisa told her that she had learned to weave clunies from Mimi’s online tutorial.  Huh??  If you have watched Elisa’s cluny demonstration video, you will have noted that her warping method is different from what Mimi demonstrates in the tutorial.  I have been trying to work out precisely how she does it (and Patty D. has tried, unsuccessfully, to explain it to me), but it all happens too fast in the video.  Mimi, being our own queen of the cluny tally, was able to follow it  and was kind enough to demonstrate it to me.  It was a Eureka moment!  The method is much faster than the traditional warp wrap and provides a completely stable platform for starting the work.  The only problem that I have with it is maintaining sufficient tension on the central warp, but I am sure that will come with practice.

Oh, I almost forgot, the purple butterfly in the last post won first place in its category and class (original design with a wingspan over 2″).

Stay tuned for another cluny photo tutorial…

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